Bamboo Top Import And Export Countries And Current International Market Price

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Bamboos are typically fast-growing perennials, with some species growing as much as 30 centimeters or 1 foot per day. Bamboos are distributed in tropical and subtropical to mild temperate regions, with the heaviest concentration and the largest number of species in East and Southeast Asia and on islands of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Bamboo is one of the most prolific plants on the planet and is widely known nowadays as Green Gold.

The number of species of Bamboo totals almost 1,500 worldwide, while only about 100 of those species are used for commercial purposes.

Top Bamboo exporters are:

  • China
  • Vietnam
  • Netherlands
  • Thailand

Top Bamboo importing countries are:

  • USA
  • Turkey
  • Netherlands
  • Bangladesh
  • China

The continents that grow the most bamboo across the world are Asia, Australia, North America, South America, and Africa. While most bamboo is grown in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia. China is indisputably the world’s largest producer of bamboo with its local Bamboo industry valued at 39 Billion dollars. India comes second in the world.

In China and India, many people in villages construct their houses with Bamboo. The largest importing Bamboo nations in the world are the USA, Turkey, Netherlands, Bangladesh, and China. These nations combinedly import 73 percent of the total Bamboo imports carried worldwide. China is the largest exporter of Bamboo alongside Vietnam, the Netherlands, and Thailand.

Bamboo shoots are quoted on the international market at over 20 dollars per pound.

 

Bamboo Top Import And Export Countries And Current International Market Price

Now let’s Get to the main topic of today, Bamboos are typically fast-growing perennials, with some species growing as much as 30 centimeters or 1 foot per day. The woody ringed stems, known as culms, are typically hollow between the rings and grow in branching clusters from a thick rhizome which is an underground stem. Bamboo culms can attain heights ranging from 10 to 15 centimeters which are about 4 to 6 inches in the smallest species to more than 40 meters which is about 130 feet in the largest.

While the narrow leaves on young culms usually arise directly from the stem rings, mature culms often sprout horizontal leaf-bearing branches. Most bamboos flower and produce seeds only after 12 to 20 years of growth, and then only do so once in their lifetime; Bamboos reproduction is largely vegetative. Some species spread aggressively and can form a dense undergrowth that excludes other plants.

Bamboos are distributed in tropical and subtropical to mild temperate regions, with the heaviest concentration and the largest number of species in East and Southeast Asia and on islands of the Indian and Pacific oceans. A few species of the genus Arundinaria are native to the southern United States, where they form dense canebrakes along riverbanks and in marshy areas.

Bamboos are used for a great variety of purposes, especially in East and Southeast Asia. The seeds of some species are eaten as a grain, and the cooked young shoots of some bamboos are eaten as vegetables, especially in Chinese cuisines.

The raw leaves are useful fodder for livestock. The pulped fibers of several bamboo species, especially Dendrocalamus strictus and Bambusa bamboos, are used to make fine-quality paper.

The jointed stems of bamboo have perhaps the most numerous uses; the largest stems supply planks for houses and rafts, while both large and small stems are lashed together to form the scaffoldings used on building construction sites. The stems are also split up to make buckets and pipes or are used to make furniture, flooring, walking sticks, fishing poles, garden stakes, and other utensils. Some species of bamboo are used as ornamentals in landscape gardens.

The fine-grained silica produced in the joints of bamboo stems has been used as a medicine in the Orient for centuries under the name tabasheer. East Asian artists, poets, and epicures have long celebrated the beauty and utility of bamboo in paintings and verse.

Where Bamboo Is Most Commonly Grown:

Bamboo is one of the most prolific plants on the planet and is widely known nowadays as Green Gold. The number of species of Bamboo totals almost 1,500 worldwide, while only about 100 of those species are used for commercial purposes. It’s common to believe that bamboo only grows in Asian countries where pandas live, but, in reality, bamboo can grow in almost any region of the world.

The continents that grow the most bamboo across the world are Asia, Australia, North America, South America, and Africa. While most bamboo is grown in Asia, especially Southeast Asia, that doesn’t mean it’s lacking in other regions. It shouldn’t be so strange to realize that bamboo grows quite abundantly in non-Asian countries, but it was a surprise that none is grown in Europe. I wasn’t too surprised about none being in Antarctica though.

In North America, there used to be enormous areas of the Southeast United States completely covered in bamboo. As a matter of fact, over 5 million acres in the Southeast United States were taken over by swaths of bamboo until local farmers removed them to make way for local cash crops. Even though bamboo can be used as a source of food and building material, the other crops must have been more useful.

In Southeast Asia, bamboo has for centuries been a staple material used throughout their civilization. It was discovered that it was more common to build houses, household items, bamboo clothes, and general infrastructure with bamboo as opposed to stone or brick due to the mass abundance of the material.

To this day, Southeast Asia has the largest amount of bamboo growth and readily uses it to produce retail products. As a matter of fact, the likeliness that any bamboo products you purchased were manufactured in Southeast Asia, in particular China, is very high.

Bamboo is also heavily present in Japan and has been used for centuries in the same way that other Asian countries used it. One amazing fact about bamboo in Japan is that it was the only plant to have survived the atomic bombings in Hiroshima back in 1945.

The destruction of all living things was expansive, but the local bamboo was able to resist the atomic blast. While the bamboo has since been removed from the area due to safety reasons, you can still find remnants of the actual plants in Japanese museums.

However, China remains the world leader in terms of growing and trading bamboo. With an industry valued at 39 billion dollars in 2018, China is indisputably the world’s largest producer of bamboo. However, it is far from the only country that profits from native bamboo according to reports, a large number of countries that trade in these products include India, Indonesia, Vietnam, the USA, the Philippines, Thailand, and many more.

China is the largest producer of Bamboo in the world and India comes second in the world. In China and India, many people in villages construct their houses with Bamboo. Though construction using Bamboo has reduced in recent years one can still see houses like this in Rural areas.

 

Top Bamboo Importing Countries: The largest importing Bamboo nations in the world are the USA, Turkey, Netherlands, Bangladesh, and China. These nations combinedly import 73 percent of the total Bamboo imports carried worldwide.

 

Top Bamboo exporting countries:

China remains the largest producer and exporter of bamboo: the country accounted for 65 percent of the world exports of bamboo and rattan products, with an estimated value of 1207 million dollars. Other top exporters of Bamboo include: Vietnam, Netherlands, and Thailand

Overview of the Global Bamboo Market:

The global bamboos market was valued at 72,102.4 Million dollars in 2019 and is expected to reach over 98,757.9 Million dollars by 2026, growing at a CAGR of around 5.5 percent during the forecast period from 2020 to 2026.

Bamboos provide a range of social, cultural, and environmental benefits to society. Bamboo is a natural resource that can develop under a variety of climatic conditions, but ideally a tropical one. It contains around 35 percent more oxygen and consumes 40 percent more carbon dioxide compared to trees, resulting in a major change in air quality.

Increasing infrastructure development investment and consumer awareness about the benefits of bamboo can boost the market of bamboo in the forecast period.

 

Bamboo Growth Factors:

The drivers which contribute to the growth are the growing demand for bamboo fiber and increasing investment in clothing and furnishing. Bamboo fiber is thinner as compared to hair and has a round and smooth surface which makes it abrasion-proof, anti-fungal, and antibacterial features creating an upsurge in the demand for Bamboo Fiber.

Restraints for the bamboo market are the high cost of processing and stringent regulation on the chemical processing of bamboo fiber. The extinction of bamboos due to resource depletion and a slowdown in world economic growth are some of the prominent challenges faced by bamboos market players across the globe.

Global Bamboos Market Segmentation:

On the basis of the end-user, the global bamboos market is segmented as construction, wood and furniture, paper and pulp, textile, medical, agriculture, and food products.

Which wood and furniture segment is expected to account for Lion’s share followed by the construction segment, attributed to rising demand for quality furniture across the globe.

Global Bamboos Market Regional Analysis: China is the largest producer of Bamboo across the globe followed by India with a significant growth rate over the forecast period.

In terms of volume, Asia Pacific is expected to dominate the global bamboos market over the forecast period, owing to rising demand for furniture with the rapid growth of per capita income of the consumer in the region. The paper and pulp industries in India and China are among the most established industries growing at significant rates.

In terms of value, North America and Europe are anticipated to account for relatively high shares, attributed to the high demand for quality products with high GDP in the regions.

Other major producers of bamboo include Myanmar, Thailand, Bangladesh, and Cambodia. China is the biggest exporter of bamboo and Europe is having the world’s largest import market.

Bamboo shoots are quoted on the international market at over 20 dollars per pound.

We would like to conclude this post by stating that there are many plants out there that you can grow for profit. One of the plants you should really consider growing is bamboo. Over half the world’s population depends on it in one way or another. Not only is bamboo the fastest-growing plant, but it is also extremely tough. A grove of bamboo that was located at ground zero in Hiroshima actually survived the atomic blast and sprouted new shoots the very next day.

Bamboo has many uses too. It is often used as a ground cover, a specimen plant, a hedge, a shade plant, concrete reinforcing, water pipes, fencing, and much, much more. That’s why it’s a cash crop just waiting to be grown.

 

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Conclusion

Bamboos are one of the most prolific plants on the planet. There are almost 1,500 species of bamboo worldwide, but only about 100 are used for commercial purposes. The continents that grow the most bamboo across the world are Asia, Australia, North America, South America, and Africa.

 

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